2016, Volume 12, Issue 1

Effect of eastern martial arts on bringing up and behavior of children and adolescents in the opinion of sensei and parents or caregivers



Renata Grzywacz1, Krzysztof Przednowek1, Robert Bąk1, Marta Niewczas1

1Faculty of Physical Education, University of Rzeszów, Rzeszow, Poland


Author for correspondence: Renata Grzywacz; Faculty of Physical Education, University of Rzeszów, Rzeszow, Poland; email: renatag[at]ur.edu.pl


Full text

Abstract

Background & Study Aim: Martial arts involvement among children and adolescents has been described in many controversial terms. The study of the effects of martial arts training on youth show lot of contrasting images. While some refer to enhanced personal and social opportunities for those that participate in martial arts, others warn against increased levels of aggressiveness and antisocial behavior among its participants after trainings. The aim of this study are the psychological and social effects of martial arts training of children and youth in the evaluation of coaches and parents or caregivers.

Material & Methods: The research was conducted on group of 47 sensei (coaches) and 137 parents or caregivers of children training karate. Among sensei group there was a division due to the size of the club: small up to 200 members (53%) and large from 200 members including (47%). Research tool was the original questionnaire survey consisting of two part: A Survey for Sensei (coaches) and Survey B for parents or caregivers of children who regularly train karate.

Results: More than half of respondents do not notice problems with self-discipline and concentration (57%). In addition, the size of the clubs do not differentiate substantially this opinion. The majority of respondents noticed significant changes in behavior of children (72%). The size of the club influences this phenomenon. Much more often, changes in children are declared by the sensei of big resorts (86%). The study revealed that the parents or caregivers of girls pointed out most frequently (33%) self-defense as the item, which they associate the concept of martial arts. Among parents or caregivers of male training groups martial arts are associated with individual development (46%).

Conclusions: The participation of children in karate training has a positive effect on their behavior, regardless of gender. Positive exposure on behavior of karate training groups is more clearly visible in large clubs (more than 200 members). The most common reasons for taking karate training is to develop character and positive impact of physical activity on training groups’ development therefore karate like other martial arts should be recommended as optimal form of health-related training for children and youth or part of PE.


Key words: aggression, combat sports, education, self-defense, training


Cite this article as:

AMA:

Grzywacz R, Przednowek K, Bąk R et al. Effect of eastern martial arts on bringing up and behavior of children and adolescents in the opinion of sensei and parents or caregivers. SMAES. 2016;12

APA:

Grzywacz, R., Przednowek, K., Bąk, R., & Niewczas, M. (2016). Effect of eastern martial arts on bringing up and behavior of children and adolescents in the opinion of sensei and parents or caregivers. SMAES, 12

Chicago:

Grzywacz, Renata, Przednowek Krzysztof, Bąk Robert, Niewczas Marta. 2016. "Effect of eastern martial arts on bringing up and behavior of children and adolescents in the opinion of sensei and parents or caregivers". SMAES 12

Harvard:

Grzywacz, R., Przednowek, K., Bąk, R., and Niewczas, M. (2016). Effect of eastern martial arts on bringing up and behavior of children and adolescents in the opinion of sensei and parents or caregivers. SMAES, 12

MLA:

Niewczas, Marta et al. "Effect of eastern martial arts on bringing up and behavior of children and adolescents in the opinion of sensei and parents or caregivers." SMAES, vol. 12, 2016

Vancouver:

Grzywacz R, Przednowek K, Bąk R et al. Effect of eastern martial arts on bringing up and behavior of children and adolescents in the opinion of sensei and parents or caregivers. SMAES 2016; 12