2018, Volume 14, Issue 1

Physiological and biochemical changes after a programmed kumite in male Shotokan karate practitioners



Lubomir Petrov1, Radoslav Penov2, Stefan Kolimechkov3, Albena Alexandrova1

1Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria
2Department of Wrestling and Judo, National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria
3National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria


Author for correspondence: Stefan Kolimechkov; National Sports Academy, Sofia, Bulgaria; email: dr.stefan.kolimechkov@gmail.com



Abstract

Background & Study Aim: In recent years, physiological testing in karate has been focused on the specific characteristics of this sport. Some of the tests in karate have their intensity close to competitive bouts, but do not simulate competitive conditions, while other tests simulate a competitive workload, but their intensity is not pre-determined. The aim of this study was to create a model of programmed kumite, which includes the techniques most often used in competitions, and which has a pre-determined intensity close to that employed under competitive conditions.

Material & Methods: This study included 14 men (18-29 years old), who were members of the Bulgarian national team in Shotokan karate, competing in the kumite discipline. The study was conducted in two stages: 1) in competitive conditions during the National Championships, when capillary blood lactate concentration was determined after each bout; 2) in training conditions when the programmed kumite was performed. Heart rate was registered and blood lactate concentration was determined before and after the programmed kumite.

Results: The lactate concentration increased progressively in each bout under competitive conditions. After performing the programmed kumite, the lactate concentration did not differ significantly from the one after the first bout in competition, and heart rate remained nearly constant throughout the workload with a mean heart rate of 168.7 bpm.

Conclusions: The programmed kumite model has an intensity which is close to bouts under competitive conditions, and can be used as a specific pre-competition test in the conditioning preparation of karate practitioners.


Key words: maximal oxygen uptake, lactate concentration, heart rate, performance, workload


Cite this article as:

AMA:

Petrov L, Penov R, Kolimechkov S et al. Physiological and biochemical changes after a programmed kumite in male Shotokan karate practitioners. SMAES. 2018;14

APA:

Petrov, L., Penov, R., Kolimechkov, S., & Alexandrova, A. (2018). Physiological and biochemical changes after a programmed kumite in male Shotokan karate practitioners. SMAES, 14

Chicago:

Petrov, Lubomir, Penov Radoslav, Kolimechkov Stefan, Alexandrova Albena. 2018. "Physiological and biochemical changes after a programmed kumite in male Shotokan karate practitioners". SMAES 14

Harvard:

Petrov, L., Penov, R., Kolimechkov, S., and Alexandrova, A. (2018). Physiological and biochemical changes after a programmed kumite in male Shotokan karate practitioners. SMAES, 14

MLA:

Alexandrova, Albena et al. "Physiological and biochemical changes after a programmed kumite in male Shotokan karate practitioners." SMAES, vol. 14, 2018

Vancouver:

Petrov L, Penov R, Kolimechkov S et al. Physiological and biochemical changes after a programmed kumite in male Shotokan karate practitioners. SMAES 2018; 14