2019, Volume 15, Issue 1

The use of a rotational training simulator for increasing safety during forward squat somersault on the trampoline



Andrzej Mroczkowski1

1Department of Sports and Health Promotion, University of Zielona Góra, Zielona Góra, Poland


Author for correspondence: Andrzej Mroczkowski; Department of Sports and Health Promotion, University of Zielona Góra, Zielona Góra, Poland; email: a.mroczkowski@wlnz.uz.zgora.pl

Andrzej Mroczkowski: 0000-0001-5654-7679



Abstract

Background & Study Aim: Jumping on a trampoline involves using its elastic surface for take-offs, the workouts aimed at obtaining complex, usually rotational motion over the trampoline. The cognitive purpose of the paper is the knowledge about the two phenomena: a) the effect of exercise on the rotating training simulator on increasing safety when performing a somersault on a trampoline; b) the impact of academic knowledge of rotational motion mechanics, extended by exercises on the rotating training simulator, on trampolining safety.

Material & Methods: The sample comprised 72 female physical education students aged 20.5 ±2.4 years. The participants were randomly assigned to one of the two groups (with 36 participants each). Within a month the students were taught how to perform a single forward somersault from a squatting position in different ways: group A, before training on a trampoline performed specific motor tasks (workouts) on the rotating training simulator; group B, in turn, performed conventional workouts. After test somersault performance, all the students wrote the test measuring their knowledge on motor safety during jumps on a trampoline. The evaluation was based on “zero-one” criterion (a correct or an incorrect reply). The range of rating involves a continuum from 0 (no correct reply) to 10 (all replies are correct).

Results: In group B it was found that 25% committed a second-degree error, 42% committed a first-degree error and 33% correctly performed the landing. In group A and B, second-degree and first-degree errors were noted in 3% and 28% respectively, while in 69% the landing technique was correctly performed. The mean value obtained in group A students was 7.19 while in group B the corresponding value was 5.25.

Conclusions: Faster learning of safety landing during forward squat somersault training, as compared with conventional methods, ensures a combination of the following elements of intellectual and motor nature, namely: the knowledge of rotational motion mechanics and explanation of the rules while performing workouts on a rotating training simulator.


Key words: pro-health education, motor safety, jumping, sports-related activities


Cite this article as:

AMA:

Mroczkowski A. The use of a rotational training simulator for increasing safety during forward squat somersault on the trampoline. SMAES. 2019;15

APA:

Mroczkowski, A., (2019). The use of a rotational training simulator for increasing safety during forward squat somersault on the trampoline. SMAES, 15

Chicago:

Mroczkowski, Andrzej. 2019. "The use of a rotational training simulator for increasing safety during forward squat somersault on the trampoline". SMAES 15

Harvard:

Mroczkowski, A., (2019). The use of a rotational training simulator for increasing safety during forward squat somersault on the trampoline. SMAES, 15

MLA:

Mroczkowski, Andrzej "The use of a rotational training simulator for increasing safety during forward squat somersault on the trampoline." SMAES, vol. 15, 2019

Vancouver:

Mroczkowski A. The use of a rotational training simulator for increasing safety during forward squat somersault on the trampoline. SMAES 2019; 15